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Hi friends! We’ve got author Isobel Carr sharing with us today. I kinda had a lot for her to address (too much), so then told her to ignore me and write what she wanted to. 😀 (I’m kinda stuck on the “marriageable age” for heroines in historicals. Everyone ” ” says they have to be so young and once they’re 21 they’re “so far on the shelf” but apparently that’s not true – and it’s what spawned this post, one of those conversations with Isobel.

Paranormal authors have to create their worlds from whole cloth. This can be incredibly challenging, but not, in my opinion, as challenging as creating a believable historical world. No one (sane) can come back at you with “facts” countering the supernatural rules of lycanthropy as imagined by you, but if you screw up a title, primogeniture, or some other factual aspect of history, you’re going to get crucified. Harder than solid facts, is getting the “feel” of the period right, especially as each author has an individual vision of that period, created by everything from their favorite novels, mini-series, and the research books they’ve chosen.

I’m an avowed research wonk. This means I have a lot of rather dry non-fiction on my shelves, and that I read—and re-read—a lot of my books. I want to absorb the nuances and ideas they contain so I can synthesize them into my understanding of the period in which I set my books.

I’m drawn to the naughtier, raunchier, wilder people I stumble across in my re-search (as anyone who’s read my books knows, LOL!). So my favorite biographies are books like The Lady in Red (about a great heiress who became an infamous divorcee), Courtesans (featuring the likes of Sophia Baddeley and Elizabeth Armistead), My Lady Scandalous (about a socialite turned royal mistress and eventually spy). But what this means is that *my* vision of late 18th century England might not conform with that of someone who’s main influences are Austen and Heyer and Our Tempestuous Day.

My shelves are also filled with texts like The Family, Sex, and Marriage (fabulous information about everything from the age of marriage among the upper class to general attitudes of sex and behavior),  Alienated Affections (divorce and separation in Scotland), and The Rise of the Egalitarian Family (which contains a study of the development of marrying for love as an ideal).

I know that many of us *believe* that during the late Georgian period women married when the word “girls” still applied and that by twenty-two said woman was “on the shelf”. But the data outlined by Stone in The Family, Sex, and Marriage doesn’t support that. Stone says this: “Daughters married on average at about twenty in the late sixteenth century, rising to about twenty-two to twenty-three in the seventieth and eighteenth.” So if they were making their debuts somewhere between seventeen and nineteen, they weren’t expected to marry in their first (or even their second) season. Stone further states that the date shows that close to twenty-five percent of daughters of the upper class never married (compared to about fifteen percent of sons).

Given these numbers, especially coupled with the high mortality rate of pregnancy, women must have been remarrying in fairly high numbers as around 15% of men were married more than once [thus making up for their bachelor brothers]). I find this especially interesting given the social pressures on both sexes not to remarry (as detailed in The Rise of the Egalitarian Family). Trumbach gives several reasons for this pressure, chief among them concerns about preserving the inheritance rights of the children of the first marriage. But even in cases where the marriage had produced no children, widows were often discouraged from remarrying due to families (both hers and her deceased husband’s) feeling that by doing so she was alienating her natural heirs (who they generally believed to be either her or his immediate relations).

How does this all play into my world building? Well, it helps me come up with plots that I hope are original and surprising, but still historically plausible (even if reviewers don’t always agree!). My upcoming book, Ripe for Seduction, was sparked by the story of Lady Mary Coke and Lord March. March as a young man couldn’t seem to stop himself from making indecent proposals to every pretty girl who crossed his path. When Lady Mary returned to town as a widow, he made one to her. Furious, she determined to teach him a lesson. She promptly presented herself to his parents as his betrothed, knowing full well the only people whose good opinion March cared about were his parents. March did eventually manage to secure his freedom … my hero of course will figure out that freedom is the last thing he wants.

I went by title and linked what I thought they were, so my apologies to Isobel if they’re wrong! I’m curious as to what you thought though. I find this fascinating, and accuracy/realism does affect my reading enjoyment!

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I can’t believe it’s been four months. And yet is has been. Aish. You guys, welcome Julia Broadbooks! 😀

I’ve always thought I wasn’t much of an erotic romance reader. I mean, I downloaded the sample of The Book That Shall Not Be Named, and didn’t even make it to the end. I wasn’t offended; I was bored. Which is how many of my erotic purchases end up: unfinished because I never really connected with the characters. But in the last couple of months I’ve been trying to push myself out of my comfort zone, reading-wise and otherwise. I guess I’m a victim of all the hype too since in the past few months I’ve tried a few much talked about erotic romance/erotica books. Boy, am I glad that I did!

After reading so many glowing comments (in particular from Jane at Dear Author) about Liberating Lacey by Ann Calhoun , I bought it, kind of thinking I wouldn’t finish it. I could not have been more wrong. I loved this book. I finished it a couple of days, and immediately started reading it again. The sex in Calhoun’s book is singe your fingertips hot and plentiful, but she never skimps on the emotion. To me, this read like a category novel – the conflict was all internal as the hero and heroine face their flaws and their fears and fight through them for their HEA. Watching two characters who I love figure out how much they love each other makes for a really satisfying read.

In a totally different vein, I downloaded a free ebook by Cara McKenna (the alter ego of Blaze author Meg Maguire) who I follow on twitter. She’s so fun to chat with that I wanted to give her books a try. Backwoods is a short, erotic, m/m book. It’s also a crazy dirty book. These characters have the high octane angst going on. These aren’t things I gravitate toward in my reading, but this title really worked for me. I was so invested in these characters that I couldn’t put the book down. I was in awe that McKenna could draw me in and make me care so damn much about Shane and Gabriel. I’m not sure this type of book is going to become a huge part of my reading diet, but I’m really glad I read this one and I have another short (Curio) by McKenna waiting for me.

The other books I been reading are mostly series romance. I’ve been pretty fascinated watching Entangled Publishing develop their different lines. I’ve read a couple of handfuls already and I’m curious to see how each line is going to develop its own style. I’d considered them similar enough to Harlequin’s lines, but while reading Wife for Hire by Christine Bell, it occurred to me that the differences between the two publishing houses go deeper than just the covers. Bell’s novel hits all the series requirements: fake marriage, shorter length leading to a more concentrated story, a strong internal conflict the hero and heroine have to work past to have their happy ending. But there were enough differences that it really stood out to me. There’s a bit of a light suspense subplot which was a fun change, but the big thing was the tone and the author’s voice. All through the book, even to resolution at the end, there is a certain playfulness to the book, that was really different and worked well for me here. Perhaps, stuck in my rut, I’m not reading enough new authors at Harlequin?

In my quest to broaden my horizons, I picked up new author Kathy Altman’s July SuperRomance title The Other Soldier. I don’t usually read military themed books, but I’d read a very early first chapter of her book and wanted to see where she was going to go with her story. On leave for a month Reid finds struggling Parker, whom he widowed. How do you work through that? Altman never cuts Reid any slack. Parker isn’t feeling forgiving. In fact she is everything but. She is angry and bitter but desperate to stand on her own. Ever so slowly over the course of the month, the pair has to work through their anger and guilt in order to find happiness together. I especially appreciated the portrayal of Parker’s daughter who feels so real, right down to her inability to catch a ball. There is even a sweet secondary romance that runs parallel. In the coming months SuperRomance will be adding to the word count of the line. With a nearly novel length and such complex story lines, these books really blur the boundary between single title and series.

Freshly purchased on my Kindle app I have The Sweetest Thing by Jill Shalvis (yes, I am that far behind), Shannon Stacey’s latest All He Ever Needed. I have a couple of historicals from Carolyn Jewel’s backlist, Confessions from an Arranged Marriage by Miranda Neville and Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake by Sarah MacLean because even though I’m not reading much historical romance at the moment, I can’t quit buying them. I blame the covers.

The other upcoming book I am super excited about is Megan Mulry’s November 1st release A Royal Pain. Because I’m absurdly fortunate, I got my hands on an ARC and I can tell you it is one of my favorite books of the year. Witty and smart with a hero to die for and a heroine I want as a best friend. It will be well worth the wait.

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He really needs no introduction. So without further ado… The Romance Man!

This is my second guest post for Limecello and I am not going to write my original post about oral sex. All of you are women and it is unlikely you will be giving oral sex to another woman (although there is nothing at all wrong with that and maybe you should give it a try and then go on my blog and tell us about it) so it would be pointless. Instead I thought I would write about this new trend that is happening ever since Fifty Shades was published. Their are people out there actually drawing up sexual contracts so I decided I needed one with my wife to make sure I get the necessary lovin’ I need. After minutes of negotiations here is the final contract:

Lexie’s demands for RM

1. For every blow job you get you must take the kids to the park for 3 hours 2 hours
2. You must shave your face before sex to avoid vaginal irritation
3. If you want sex you must clean the kitchen and bathrooms first
4. You must sleep in the wet spot
5. If I have at least two orgasms I will get a towel and put it over the wet spot
6. If I have a clitoral and vaginal orgasm I will let you have the extra pillow
7. Don’t try and talk dirty. You suck at it and it makes you look stupid
8. If am on top of you and you yell “Yippy Kayay Mother Fucker” again sex will stop immediately
9. If we are having doggie style sex and you “accidentally” hit the wrong hole again sex will stop immediately
10. If you ever again talk to my pussy in the cookie monster voice I will hit you

RM’s demands for Lexie

1. You must assume the “present” position and pass before sex starts
1. You must fix me a sandwich after sex
1. You must help me fix a sandwich after sex
1. When I am fixing a sandwich after sex you must tell me where the mayonnaise is if I can’t find it
2. You must swallow
2. You must swallow sometimes
2. You must be in the same room as me when I have an orgasm
3. Every time I stroke your clit with my tongue you must count “one stroke, two strokes” etc and you have to say it like Count Dracula
3. After sex you must say “No one knows how to fuck like The Matador”
3 If you are sitting on my face you must pay attention to my face to make sure I am breathing
4. Whenever you are giving me a blow job you cannot neglect the balls
4. Every once in a while you must touch my balls
5. If I give you three or more orgasms you have to sleep in the wet spot
5. You must have sex with me whenever I want
5. You must have sex with me whenever you want

One of the cool things that has happened since I started this blog is all of the cool friends I have made. One of them is Kate Douglas and she lets me give away one of her books every time I guest blog. So leave a comment and win a copy of either Dream Bound or Crystalfire. The giveaway is international.

… I don’t even know what to say. Other than Lexie (The Romance Man’s Wife) is obviously a good sport. So what do you think? Have you written a Sex Contract? RM also told me this is what gave him the inspiration, in case you wanted to check it out.

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Hi Lovelies! Today we’ve got Jess Dee visiting with us! And also, Jayne Rylon, and Lorelei James should be stopping by to answer any questions you have. I expect you’ll have something to say, yes? 😉

Two To Tango

Once upon a time, a long, long time ago (okay, maybe 4 or 5 years ago), a call went out around the kingdom. Samhain had decided to publish a trilogy of books—all three of them ménage romances—and were looking for authors to write those stories.

Authors far and wide scurried to heed the call. Books were written and submitted, and the breathless wait for further announcements began. Weeks passed in nervous anticipation, until finally a statement was issued by Samhain. Three books had been selected for the anthology. Three very different books which all had a common theme: Red-hot, erotic threesome romance.

And so the Menage And More/Three’s Company anthology was born, with authors Lorelei James, Jayne Rylon and Jess Dee at the helm.

 

The anthology released, and the authors had a wonderful time with readers buying and reading their books. Years passed, with the authors moving on to other, different projects. But a restlessness seemed to be growing. A yearning to revisit the times of old. A longing to reopen the pages of the anthology.

And then came the day a message went out. Not around the kingdom. This time, straight to our inboxes. And this is what the message said:

Jess/Lorelei ah, my menage and more buddies.  I remember the days when I was a super newbie and I got thrown into an antho with two big names.  Luckiest day ever for me.  I think Three’s Company has been a smashing success and every time I sign one at a conference I think of you two and smile.  So, why not get the gang together for another run at it?  I know I’ve talked to both of you about the possibility at some point in the past year.

Here’s the deal… Lorelei pitched the idea to Lindsey. Her spin was doing something mainstream, straight m/f and playing off TWO instead of THREE.  She would do a non-cowboy story, I would try to remember how to write straight non-super erotic m/f and Jess… well, this seems right up your alley.  I brainstormed some titles/ideas today in a meeting (don’t judge!) and here are a few concepts I came up with:

Two to Tango
Two of a Kind
Make it Two
Two Strikes (this could be people who have broken up before and are getting back together)
Two Shakes (could be people who fall in love/lust fast)
Two Can Play
Two to Two-Step… ha ha lame.
Two Timers (again could would for a second chance kind of thing)
Two in the Bush (HAHAHAHAHAHA  This could be another menage book!!!)
Two Peas in a Pod
Two’s Company

How about it?  Are we in?

Jayne

Jess laughed at the message. Luckiest day ever for Jayne? Er, hell no. Luckiest day ever for Jess. As for Lorelei, she wasted no time laughing. Quicker than the other two could blink, she’d organized for the trilogy to be published. And thus Two To Tango was born.

Which is why, on the 2nd of October, these three books, which form the Two To Tango anthology, release in e-format at Samhain Publishing.

 

We hope you enjoy reading them as much as we enjoyed writing them.

🙂

Lorelei, Jayne & Jess

So have you read books from Samhain before? What do you think about menage romances? Or any of these great authors? Come on – I’m curious as to what you have to say. (And I challenge you to throw out some eyebrow raising questions too!) 😉

*ETA: There are books as prizes up for grabs, in case you needed the incentive! 😀

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Hi friends! We’re back with a special reader guest post! Yes! Can you believe it’s the third Saturday of the month?! Eek! I can’t! I always tell people I have the best blog readers – and I firmly believe that. Pam sometimes visits here, and she is definitely a great example. I’d love to feature more of you! Anyway, here’s Pam! (And, I’m going to be a massive jerk and hijack her post for a minute – I’ve actually been on hiatus-ish since the beginning of August. I’ve gotten thousands of emails, and have still over 1,000 unread right now. I know I owe a lot of people responses, and more importantly prizes – and I’m doing my best to get on that. Please continue to be patient, and accept my apologies!)

… And now I must apologize to Pam for being all “me me me” – luckily, she like the rest of you, is awesome, and I’m sure she understands. So without further ado, meet an awesome member of the romance community! A reader! ❤

Hello everyone! First let me just say thank you to Lime for taking a chance on me and giving me this opportunity to write a post for her blog.

My name is Pam, although I tend to go by the username VanillaOrchids online. Until sometime in 2009, I didn’t like reading. I rarely ever read a book just for the fun of it. That was until I read the Twilight Saga series by Stephenie Meyer. You see, two of my sisters and two of my nephews and I went to see the movie Twilight when it was released. The movie was okay, nothing spectacular. I enjoyed it for what it was. While the credits were rolling, my sister Linda proceeded to tell me that the movie is based off of a book and the book is way better. Then she offered to give me all four of the books in the series to read.

Fast forward about six months. The power went out because of a storm so I thought I’d give one of the books Linda gave me a try. Well, she had given me two books from the Vampire Diaries series as well, and since those books were smaller reads than the Twilight books, I started with one of those first. I probably didn’t get five pages into it before I said forget it! It’s been so long since then, but from what I remember, I felt that the Vampire Diaries book was written for little kids. I found it childish. Because of that, I gave all of the books (including the Twilight books) to my sister Patty in case she wanted to read them. Patty couldn’t go the Vampire Diaries books either but she did start on Twilight. So then one day while she was still working on Twilight she tells me that it isn’t like the Vampire Diaries books and that she thought I’d like Twilight. When she was finished with it, she gave it back to me. I had it done in two days and wanted book 2 … like now! LOL Patty gave me book two though she wasn’t finished reading it, but she knew that I’d have it read quick enough. I had all four books read in a week.

I didn’t know what to do with myself then. I wanted more to read but didn’t have anything. Eventually I started buying books on eBay or in stores. There probably hasn’t been a day that’s gone by since then that I’ve not been reading. Then late last year I had created a blog, more for myself really, to keep track of books that I wanted to read or have read, my favorite authors, etc. Then when I started to write book reviews, I decided to use the blog for that instead. That’s also about the time that I paid attention to other people’s reviews of books that I was interested in reading.

Recently I started reading a series of historical romances. After I finished the second book in the series, I went to Goodreads to mark the book as finished. While there I saw a one star review for the book that I’d just read. Here I was thinking the book was good. One of things that the person mentioned was the historical inaccuracies within the book. I’m sure the author did plenty of research and knows a lot about the time period, but in my opinion, it’s a work on fiction, it doesn’t have to be so strict with the historical details. But that’s just my opinion. And the primary complaint was that in that time a woman would not be without a chaperone. That might be true but can you really write an interesting love story when the two main characters never have a moment alone to be steal a kiss or a touch? Ah well, what do I know, I’m not a writer. 🙂

So anyway, I’m just happy that I now have a love of reading. And maybe with time I’ll get better at reviewing books. As for the whole blogging thing, I doubt that my book blog will ever really take off, and I’m fine with that. It’s a place for me to post reviews or graphics (which is another hobby of mine) or whatever I feel like. I don’t ever want it to feel like a job. I’ve known all too well what that’s like since I’ve had a website online for nearly 15 years now.

One last thing while I’m here. Awhile back on my blog I asked people for book recommendations. Not one person posted any. LOL So if Lime doesn’t mind, I’d like to ask the visitors here what book(s) you recommend? In return, I’m offering one winner an ebook of their choice (up to $5) from Amazon.

Thanks again to Lime for allowing me to ramble on for a bit. 🙂

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Hi Friends! This post has been a long time coming. Ms. SonomaLass was actually supposed to take place last year, but SL actually had wrist surgery, so we rescheduled. So everyone give her a warm welcome! She has a really interesting post with a question I’d love to hear you answer too.

Last month over on my blog, I reviewed Robin Lee Hatcher’s Kiss Me, Katie for the TBR Challenge. The thing that everyone who commented, either on the blog or Twitter, seemed to find most interesting was that this book was rewritten and re-released by the author eight years after it was originally published. Hatcher shifted to publishing with a Christian publisher, and she chose to “redeem” (her term) some of her books for that market. The conversation got me thinking, and talking to other readers, about the larger picture of re-released romances and what, if anything, the author does to the book before setting it before a new audience.

Re-issuing books is not a new phenomenon. Nora Roberts’ publishers, for example, love to put out her older titles again (and again), sometimes with new titles and covers, so that she developed the NR logo to distinguish new releases from re-releases. But as digital publishing platforms make it easier and cheaper to get books into the hands of readers, we’re seeing and will continue to see an increase. Authors whose book rights have reverted to them, in particular, can re-package and -release those books, rather than leaving them to the used book market.

An author who chooses to re-release an older work faces choices. She needs a new cover, for one thing; cover art and cover copy usually belong to the original publisher. And depending on the age of the book, and the author’s own writing habits, she may not have a digital version of the manuscript, which means that one will need to be created. The technology for doing that results in numerous errors, so even a previously proofread and edited book will need to be proofed again. All of that can be outsourced, and the book can then be released in a new edition that is essentially the same as the older one, at least between the “covers,” if that’s what an author wants.

What happens, though, if the author doesn’t want that? If she looks over her older work and cringes, seeing how much better (in her own mind, anyway) she’s become as a writer? Or what if editorial decisions were made about the book that she wasn’t happy with, or the author has become aware of errors she made when writing the book? Should the author release the book “as is,” or rather, “as was”? Or should she rewrite/revise/improve it?

Most authors seem to be happy just releasing the books repackaged but not revised; this is the logical economic choice, because the time spent revising the older book would be time taken away from writing a new one, and it represents even more investment (cover art and proofreading aren’t cheap services) that needs to be recouped to make the re-released title profitable. And most readers seem fine with that; as long as they know they are buying an older book, they tend to be reasonably forgiving if it isn’t quite what they’re used to from the author more recently. I admit, I’m interested in the exceptions to that.

One exception, of course is Hatcher — she says on her web site that “Many of my earlier novels contain elements that are contrary to what I hope to share with readers today.” She goes on to say, “I have “redeemed” some of my earlier fiction, giving them a second chance to become the books I wish I’d written the first time around.” While Hatcher’s case is an extreme one, I wonder how many other authors will take the opportunity of re-release to make the books ones they “wish” they’d written.

Another exception is Pamela Clare, whose perspective is the opposite. Her second historical romance, Carnal Gift (2004), was cut by 100 pages to fit the publisher’s length requirements. When her rights reverted in late 2010, she says on her blog, “I was so excited because it meant that for the first time I would be able to share with you the story I had written. The story that was published has never felt like my books. How could it with more than 20 percent of the pages gone?” Her approach was simple: “I opened up the original, uncut manuscript, gave it a fresh edit, and made it available to my readers as an ebook.” Clare’s “author’s cut” is, in her mind, the book she DID write the first time around.

Clare and Hatcher are both pretty straightforward with their readers about their changes; Hatcher changed the title to Catching Katie, while Clare clearly identifies the new version of Carnal Gift as the “author’s cut.” I think that’s very important, so that readers know they’re getting a different book. Of course the work is the author’s, and she has every right to make changes, but I do think it’s good to be clear with readers about the differences between older and newer editions.

Just as I’d be troubled by a freshly edited re-release that wasn’t clearly labeled as such, I don’t like it when an older title is released without being clearly identified as such. If readers are mostly pretty understanding about the differences they’ll encounter in an older book, they might be upset to purchase a “new” title by a favorite author, only to find that it’s a re-released title.  One recent example I encountered (hardly unusual) is Barbara Hambly’s Open Road Media re-release, Bride of the Rat God. When I received it for review, I didn’t know that it had originally been published in 1994, and it wasn’t clear in the edition I received. I mentioned it to a friend who recognized the title, and a quick look at reviews on the book’s Amazon page confirmed it, but it still wasn’t mentioned in the book’s description.

So what do other readers think? Do you want authors to revise their backlist works before re-releasing, or would you rather read the book “as was”? Have you had any surprises, pleasant or otherwise, now that there are so many re-releases available digitally?  I’ve just scratched the surface with these examples, and I think it’s a really interesting aspect of where we are in publishing today.

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So… if you’ve been around for a while, you know I wanted to do a feature on Men Who Read Romance. I thought it’d be an interesting counter part to the guest readers we have each month. I then started asking around, but then Thea Harrison had the same idea about ~2 weeks later, and her response was overwhelming, so I tabled mine. (Then also people were all “well I want to hear what women have to say.” And I had to very nicely say I already do that. In fact, on Saturday we’ve got SonomaLass visiting with us. 

But the point is – as part of my original search, The Romance Man burst onto the scene in romance land and he’s kinda a big deal. He’s got quite the following, and I can’t imagine the harem he’d have if he ever went to one of the conferences. (I think his wife should tease him mercilessly about that, but I don’t know RM or Lexie that well.) Anyway, I got him to agree to guest every other month. I told him he could talk about anything he wanted to. And he can. I just suggested for the first post, he write an introduction of sorts. He has a pretty good “About” page on his site – I thought he’d just do a few sentences, then go into what he offered to write initially. (Which I guess/imagine will show up in September.)

This is what he sent.

I would like to apologize up front. I wanted to write a blog about the proper way to stimulate the clitoris because it is the only thing in the world I am good at but Limecello insisted I write an introduction and she is very bossy – (I don’t know why people say that…>.>) so I will have to save that blog for another time. That was a really long fucking sentence I think there should have been a comma somewhere.

My name is Wrath and I have a blog called The Romance Man. You can google it and it is on page 15,473. Ok I lied my real name isn’t Wrath but that’s what my wife calls me ever since she read Dark Lover. I am forty-two years old and I live in Florida. I am a small business owner and the father of three beautiful girls that are allegedly mine.

About eight months ago I read my first romance novel and I have been hooked ever since. The book was Because of You by Jessica Scott. I really liked it and I began reading more and more books. I was surprised at how good these books were because I thought, like a lot of people, that romance novels were stupid books written for stupid women. I had fallen into that whole elitist, romance novels aren’t real literature bullshit. I have come to find out that romance readers and writers are some of the smartest women I have ever met. My blog has become pretty popular and I talk to these women all the time and they are smart, educated women and they get a bad rap from the dickhead critics in the world who think they know good writing but could never write a book themselves. My readers are called the BBL’s and they are incredibly bright women who have read every romance novel ever written.  They often recommend books to me and have even taken over reviewing books for my blog.

I am still a novice and have not read many books but I know what I like. Paranormal is not really my thing. I have a hard time relating to characters that aren’t real. I have read one historical and I liked it but mostly contemporary romance is what I like. I have been very surprised at the talented writers in the romance community and their ability to continually create new ideas.

I think that men are missing a big opportunity by not reading these books – they are like a blueprint for what women like. When I started reading them I would read them in bed at night with my wife and had a very positive effect on our marriage and sex life. Most importantly it gave us something to talk about.

It pisses me off now when I hear people refer to romance as “mommy porn”. The fact is I don’t read these books for the sex – if I wanted that I would just watch porn. I read them because they are well written books with good story lines and they are entertaining. I will continue to read them and recommend them to other people – especially men. That is the goal of my blog – to get men to read these books because I think it is something that can bring them closer to their wives. Essentially I am like Oprah except I am white and have a penis.

Me again. Incidentally – I think y’all should know. After numerous emails (and tweets) back and forth with RM… this is/was his state. And confession – I’m pretty sure that’s what he’s like in general. Yes, complete with the lights and techno. Shhh don’t tell him. 😉 Actually, haha, he brought it up first. 😛

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